Art

Portland on the Pulse

COURTESY OF TRIPLE CANDIE
There's no shortage of great art in Portland. Make sure you catch these three show before they're gone for good. 

BEING PRESENT: REVISITING, SOMEWHAT UNFAITHFULLY, PORTLAND’S MOST EXPERIMENTAL ART EXPERIMENT, PCVA

• Through June 14
• Portland Art Museum, 1219 SW Park Ave., Portland
portlandartmuseum.org

When it opened in 1972, the Portland Center for the Visual Arts was hailed as a triumph. Created by artists for artists, the space played host to progressive (and impressive) behemoths, including Joan Jonas, Robert Irwin, Meredith Monk, and Bruce Nauman. After struggling financially, the PCVA closed in 1987. This show asks whether an institution that propagated art-world biases was ever socially conscious. Composed of works from the maverick curatorial agency Triple Candie—none of which are “art” but all of which are “unfaithful…reproductions, surrogates, models, stage-sets, or common objects”—Being Present sets out to celebrate PCVA’s legacy while also examining its contradictions.

Untitled, by Marlon Mullen.© MARLON MULLEN
Untitled, by Marlon Mullen.
MARLON MULLEN

• Feb. 7–Mar. 21
• Adams and Ollman, 418 NW 8th Ave., Portland
adamsandollman.com

Marlon Mullen is on the autism spectrum and rarely or never uses words to communicate—unless he’s painting. The Richmond, California–based artist takes found photography and headlines, often from publications like ArtForum or ARTnews, and reduces them to vibrant and graphic abstractions that yield moments of revelation. Fresh from exhibiting at the 2019 Whitney Biennial and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s SECA Art Award show, Mullen returns to Adams and Ollman for a highly anticipated third show featuring a variety of works.

Real estate magnate Jordan D. Schnitzer poses with three works by John Baldessari. Schnitzer’s private print collection—one of the largest in the world—contains more than 13,000 works by Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Barbara Kruger, and others.
Real estate magnate Jordan D. Schnitzer poses with three works by John Baldessari. Schnitzer’s private print collection—one of the largest in the world—contains more than 13,000 works by Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Barbara Kruger, and others.
JOHN BALDESSARI: FROM THE COLLECTIONS OF JORDAN D. SCHNITZER

• Mar. 5–Apr. 12
• Blue Sky, 122 NW 8th Ave., Portland
blueskygallery.org

This spring, John Baldessari’s photo-conceptualist work gets top billing at Blue Sky. The artist’s groundbreaking method of appropriating existing images and modifying them to undermine their original intent greatly influenced artists of the Pictures Generation (Cindy Sherman, Barbara Kruger, Robert Longo), who, like Baldessari, sought to dissect the power of advertisements, scenes from television, and more. For this show, Jordan D. Schnitzer has loaned a selection of pieces from his collection of more than 276 Baldessari prints, all of which have shaped the face of photo-based printmaking.

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